Author Archives: ficusinterfaith

dxiaqlgw0aimmuh

Advertisements

There Are Birds Here

For Detroit

 

There are birds here,
so many birds here
is what I was trying to say
when they said those birds were metaphors
for what is trapped
between buildings
and buildings. No.
The birds are here
to root around for bread
the girl’s hands tear
and toss like confetti. No,
I don’t mean the bread is torn like cotton,
I said confetti, and no
not the confetti
a tank can make of a building.
I mean the confetti
a boy can’t stop smiling about
and no his smile isn’t much
like a skeleton at all. And no
his neighborhood is not like a war zone.
I am trying to say
his neighborhood
is as tattered and feathered
as anything else,
as shadow pierced by sun
and light parted
by shadow-dance as anything else,
but they won’t stop saying
how lovely the ruins,
how ruined the lovely
children must be in that birdless city.
Jamaal May, “There Are Birds Here” from The Big Book of Exit Strategies. Copyright © 2016 by Jamaal May. Reprinted by permission of Alice James Books.
Source: The Big Book of Exit Strategies (Alice James Books, 2016)

Fruit Peel Workshop

“Orange Peel to Sweet Animals” time at @food__officehours 34 East Broadway, part of the final day of Food Radio Season 1: “Office Hours” Oct 26-Nov 16  @food__newyork 

IMG_0220IMG_0259IMG_0266IMG_0264IMG_0244IMG_0020IMG_0257IMG_0263IMG_0252IMG_0253

funky copy2

hb_1994.371

Artist: Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (British, London 1812–1852 Ramsgate)

Factory: Minton(s) (British, Stoke-on-Trent, 1793–present)

Date: ca. 1850

Culture: British, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire

Medium: Stoneware

Dimensions: Overall (wt. includes wall mount): 13 1/8 in., 4.7 lb. (33.3 cm, 2.1092 kg)

Classification: Ceramics-Pottery

Credit Line: Purchase, Cynthia Hazen Polsky Gift, 1994

Accession Number: 1994.371

This shallow dish raised on a short foot is made in the encaustic process, an “inlay” technique of filling a stamped or recessed design with a contrasting colored clay or slip. The inscription on the rim in pseudo-Gothic lettering reads: “Waste Not Want Not.” Pugin made two versions of this tazza, the first with four colors and the second with six. The first version was exhibited at the 1849 Exhibition of British Manufacturers in Birmingham. Pugin believed that objects made with moral intentions would transfer these to the user, thereby promoting a more wholesome existence. The motto also reflected the agricultural and economic problems of England’s “hungry forties.”

Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812–1852) was the first architect/designer to link a specific style to morals, godliness, and social values. He believed that manufacturers should be truthful in their use of materials; that wood should look like wood instead of being painted to look like marble. This tenet of truth to materials was the crux of the Arts and Crafts movement. Pugin also believed that deceptive construction was inherent to the classical style, whereas honest construction was in accord with the Gothic. Pugin, with the architect Charles Barry, received the commission to rebuild the Houses of Parliament in the Gothic style following a fire in 1834. He designed the interior decoration in the same style, sparking the Gothic Revival in England. Pugin also designed domestic and ecclesiastical objects in ceramic, precious metals, and wood, all in the Gothic style.

January Gallery

Did you say today?
Did you say tomorrow
Or the next day, or the day afterwards?
Did you say a picture at a January Gallery?
Did you say a glass eye for your mirror
For a club foot for a clump of wintry woods?
For a little lavender that stares back at you
Today and tomorrow, and days afterwards.

-Alfred Starr Hamilton

Tilings by Jaap Scherphuis

https://www.jaapsch.net/tilings/#pentagon

cb0eea28-8fe7-4cc3-a0ce-896c6f8a6fb4-bestSizeAvailable

The 15 types of pentagonal tilings discovered so far, the 15th (convex monohedral) pentagonal tiling, discovered in 2015

11bcfab5-92e3-45cb-abdd-01e1809e3f89-1020x612 (1)

Terminology

Tiling or tessellation
A dissection of the infinite flat plane into shapes of a finite area.
Tile
One of the shapes that forms a tiling.
Isometry
A distance-preserving mapping of the plane. There are four types: translations, rotations, reflections, and glide reflections.
Symmetry of a tiling
An isometry that maps the tile boundaries onto tile boundaries. In other words this is some transformation that leaves the tiling looking the same as before.
Periodic tiling
A tiling that has two independent translation symmetries, i.e. a tiling that repeats itself along two different axes like a wallpaper pattern.
Primitive unit or Unit Parallelogram
A section of the tiling (usually a parallelogram or a set of neighbouring tiles) that generates the whole tiling using only translations, and which is as small as possible.
Fundamental unit
A section of the tiling (usually a set of neighbouring tiles) that generates the whole tiling using the tiling symmetries (not just the translations), and which is as small as possible.
Monohedral tiling
A tiling where all the tiles are congruent to each other, i.e. all have the same size and shape (though they are allowed to be mirror images).
Isohedral tiling
A monohedral tiling where for any two tiles there is a symmetry of the tiling that maps one tile to the other.
k-Isohedral tiling (k is a positive integer)
A monohedral tiling where the tiles form k classes such that for any two in the same class there is a symmetry of the tiling that maps one tile to the other, and for any pair of tiles in different classes no such symmetry exists. Note that 1-isohedral is the same as isohedral. In the applet, each class of tile has its own colour.
Edge-to-edge tiling
A tiling of polygons such that no corner of one tile touches the side of another.

 

Frame House Whereabouts

Ficus Interfaith
Frame House Whereabouts

September 14 – October 21, 2018

Interstate Projects
Opening Reception September 14, 6-9pm

 

 

The word ‘building’ is both a noun and a verb: the structure itself and the act of making it. As a noun, a building is shelter that has a roof, walls and stands more or less permanently in one place.

Ancient households layered sand to cover compacted earth; creating a warm, soft covering that could be replaced regularly. In some dwellings, seed shells such as peanut and sunflower were scattered across the floor. As it was walked on, the oil from the shells would coat the occupants’ feet and become spread out across the ground, hardening its surface while making it more compact, stable, and free of dust.

Archaeologists use the term, terrazzo, to describe some of the floors created over 10,000 years ago in Neolithic settlements across Western Asia. Excavation notes illustrate beautiful, dusty pads of mottled stone chips pressed and polished into patterns in the ground. This practice continued through antiquity as marble artisans fashioned the floors of their own homes with the leftover marble tile scraps from the days’ work. Today, many of the aggregates used in terrazzo are pulled from the industrial waste-stream, continuing its history of reuse in construction.

For this exhibition, Ficus Interfaith presents a series of terrazzo frames. These frames, along with an additional suite of sculptures, describe navigating a house. The works occupy two floors, vibrating between the distinctions of display room and domestic space. Windows and doors operate as metaphors for other worlds, portals with the potential to activate your imagination. Embracing the spirit of collaboration and highlighting the pragmatism of reuse, the sculptures invite all to ‘play house’. The gallery acts as a skeleton with borrowed flesh, the unlived foundation of a more complete and separately constructed space.


Ficus Interfaith
 (is a collaboration between Ryan Bush (b. 1990, Denver CO) and Raphael Cohen (b. 1989, New York, NY). As much a research initiative as a sculptural practice, Ficus Interfaith pursues projects that focus on their personal and collective interactions with nature and natural history. Their work has been exhibited at Prairie (Chicago, IL), Alyssa Davis (NYC), MX Gallery (NYC) and Gern en Regalia (NYC) and they were artists in residence this year at 2727 California Street (Berkeley, CA) and Shandaken: Storm King (NY).

FicusInterfaith_Interstate1FicusInterfaith_Interstate2FicusInterfaith_Interstate3FicusInterfaith_Interstate4FicusInterfaith_Interstate5FicusInterfaith_Interstate6FicusInterfaith_Interstate7FicusInterfaith_Interstate8FicusInterfaith_Interstate9FicusInterfaith_Interstate10FicusInterfaith_Interstate11FicusInterfaith_Interstate12FicusInterfaith_Interstate13FicusInterfaith_Interstate14FicusInterfaith_Interstate15FicusInterfaith_Interstate16FicusInterfaith_Interstate17FicusInterfaith_Interstate18FicusInterfaith_Interstate19FicusInterfaith_Interstate20FicusInterfaith_Interstate21FicusInterfaith_Interstate22FicusInterfaith_Interstate23FicusInterfaith_Interstate24FicusInterfaith_Interstate25

 

http://www.interstateprojects.org/index.php?/ficus-interfaith/

IMG_9059

Your heart is fine feeling the widest
possible empathy for the day and its inhabitants

Thanks for looking at the wind
in the top of the eucalyptus
dancing like someone you know
well ‘I’m here I’m here I’m here!’

The wind picks up
a rush of leaves waving

wildly for your understanding
—apple, plum, bamboo
rooted and flourishing
next to your home
in the air awake

without defect

June 17, 2000