Author Archives: ficusinterfaith

Why People Walked Differently in Medieval Times

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/505105/why-people-walked-differently-medieval-times

USNS Comfort arrives in NYC

 

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SculptureCenter///In Practice: Total Disbelief

In Practice: Total Disbelief considers artistic engagements with dimensions of doubt as they contribute to the formation of social life. Across media, the works in the exhibition engage formal tools that uphold belief and produce what we consider to be true – narrative and cinematic tropes, photographic technologies, empiricism, and others – and use them to make any number of other truth claims. A position of disbelief may see these aesthetic conventions as valid, but still delimited by external forces, as if they are suggesting something, but not the right thing, or not saying all they can or could say.

While characterized on one hand by the clean slate of a baseline lack of faith, an active engagement with disbelief also means taking stock of astonishment, navigating defense mechanisms, and pitting skepticism against a real desire to be convinced and to know. In Practice: Total Disbelief posits that artworks are the products and by-products of these dynamics, appearing as objects, images, and activities that sustain uncertainty, not in the least about the capacities of the art object itself.

The exhibition features newly commissioned works by: Qais AssaliAndrew CannonJesse ChunHadi FallahpishehFicus InterfaithEmilie Louise GossiauxLaurie KangDevin Kenny and Andrea SolstadK.R.M. Mooneysidony o’nealMariana SilvaJordan Strafer, and Andrew Norman Wilson and is curated by Kyle Dancewicz, SculptureCenter’s Director of Exhibitions and Programs.

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Ficus Interfaith, The 59th Street Bridge Song, 2020,. Cementitious terrazzo, brass, zinc, walnut. 42 x 66.75 x 1.25 inches (106.7 x 169.5 x 1.25 cm). Courtesy the artists. Photo: Kyle Knodell

Banquet

Banquet: Marcello Dolce, Sessa Englund, Sophie Friedman-Pappas, Audrey Gair, Chris Hanke, Ficus Interfaith, Rindon Johnson, Isabelle Frances McGuire, Sam Shoemaker, Julia Thompson

December 14, 2019 – January 18, 2020

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“I propose a feast for the eyes, sumptuous, multiplictious, and occasionally disgusting. This is a banquet of works of art that include milk, rice, bread, vegetables, piles of fat, carpets of pollen, sheets of wax or chocolate, shit, urine, blood, and assorted rots. Not all dishes lend themselves to this table; only those servings that are both excessive and incessantly replenished, for this profusion of substance asserts the commodiousness of contemporary appetites, both for pleasure and transgression.”
– Buzz Spector, “A Profusion of Substance,” Artforum (October, 1989).

Banquet brings together ten artists whose work references, investigates, or employs organic substances – such as food, bodily fluids, living/non-living organisms, and raw earth – as material. The digestive cycle is on full display. Works by Chris Hanke and Julia Thompson incorporate powdered sweeteners and juices while Sophie Friedman-Pappas’ and Audrey Gair’s Untitled (Toilet Seat) and Marcello Dolce’s stole(n)cover give us a view of the other end of things. Elsewhere, a raw earthiness is evident. Sessa Englund’s works evoke abstracted organic forms and Rindon Johnson’s rawhide strips are dipped in water and dirt sourced just outside the gallery. Within Sam Shoemaker’s Untitled work lies something very much alive – a fungi of the Gonaderma Lucidum variety. A living, breathing organism that will grow over the course of the exhibition. Ficus Interfaith grinds down waste and loose rock material to develop their terrazzo pieces and, in doing so, calls into question what is natural and what is not. Isabelle Frances McGuire’s circular Ring can be seen as a metaphor for the exhibition as a whole. The enclosed loop of dead flies speaks to our multiple cycles of life and the richness of pleasure and disgust we encounter throughout them.

 

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Ficus Interfaith. The Woodcutter, 2019. Cementitious terrazzo, various rocks, walnut, domestic veneers. 24 x 20 x 2.75 inches closed, 24 x 40 x 1.375 inches open.

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Pink hearts (the one shape to survive since the beginning)

The first boxes of Lucky Charms cereal contained marshmallows in the shapes of pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers. The lineup has changed occasionally, beginning with the introduction of blue diamonds in 1975, followed by purple horseshoes in 1983,[7] red balloons in 1989, green trees in 1991, rainbows in 1992, blue moons in 1995, leprechaun hats in 1997 (temporarily replaced the green clovers), orange shooting stars and around-the-world charms in 1998 (added blue, green, yellow, purple, and red in 2011), a crystal ball in 2001, and an hourglass in 2008.[3] In 2013, 6 new rainbow swirl moons and 2 new rainbow charms were introduced. From the original four marshmallows, the permanent roster as of 2013 includes eight marshmallows.

Older marshmallows were phased out periodically. The first shapes to disappear were the yellow moons and blue diamonds, replaced by yellow/orange pots of gold and blue moons respectively in 1994. In 2006, the assortment included purple horseshoes; red balloons; blue crescent-moons; orange and white shooting stars; yellow and orange pots of gold; pink, yellow, and blue rainbows; two-tone green leprechaun hats; pink hearts (the one shape to survive since the beginning); with the most recent addition being the return of the clovers in 2004. The hourglass shape was retired in spring 2018 and was replaced by a unicorn, which was chosen on social media by way of emojis.[8][9] The size and brightness of the marshmallows changed in 2004.[10]

Recent changes to the marshmallows include the star shape taking on a “star” design, the orange five-pointed star being complemented by a white “trail.” In late 2005, another marshmallow shape was added, the “Hidden Key”. It is a solid yellow marshmallow that resembles an arched door (similar to the shape of a tombstone; flat at the bottom, flat sides with a round top). When liquid is added to the cereal, the sugar in the marshmallow dissolves and the shape of a skeleton key appears “as if by magic.” The tagline was, “Unlock the door with milk!” This “new” marshmallow type has been used in other hot and cold cereals, but with mixed success (from characters “hidden” inside a bigger marshmallow to letters appearing). In early June 2006, General Mills introduced Magic Mirror marshmallows. In 2008, yellow and orange hourglass marshmallows were introduced with the marketing tagline of, “The Hourglass Charm has the power to Stop Time * Speed Up Time * Reverse Time”. As of 2011, swirled marshmallows and rainbow-colored stars have been introduced. In 2018, for the first time in ten years Lucky Charms retired a marshmallow, which was the hourglass, and added a new permanent marshmallow, the Magical Unicorn.

The marshmallows are meant to represent Lucky’s magical charms, each with their own special meaning or “power.” The following are explanations of the permanent marshmallows:[11]

  1. Hearts – power to bring things to life
  2. Shooting Stars – power to fly
  3. Horseshoes – power to speed/slow down time
  4. Green Clovers – luck, but you will never know what kind of luck you will get
  5. Blue Moons – power of invisibility
  6. Rainbows – instantaneous travel from place to place
  7. Red Balloons – power to make things float
  8. Unicorn – according to the inaugural cereal box, unicorns can “cleanse water with a touch of their horn,” “heal whatever troubles you,” and “always know when you are telling the truth”
  9. Moon – power to change alternate gravity

Limited Edition Marshmallows

There have been more than 30 featured limited edition marshmallow shapes over the years, with the introduction of themed Lucky Charms, such as Winter Lucky Charms. Some of these include:

  • In 1986, a whale-shaped marshmallow was temporarily added to the lineup.[12]
  • In 1990, a green pine tree-shaped marshmallow was temporarily added to the lineup.[12] During that time, the cereal promoted Earth Day with a free Colorado Blue Spruce seedling with proofs-of-purchase.[13]
  • In 1991, the star and balloon shape marshmallows were combined for a short time. The red balloon featured a gold six-pointed star. The star was removed at a later date to make the Red Balloon and Star marshmallows separate.[12]
  • In 1994, sprinkles were temporarily added to the marshmallows.
  • In 1999, the moon shape marshmallows were modified with the addition of the yellow curve line for a limited time.
  • In 2000, a “New Sparkling Rainbow” was added to the mix for a limited time. It was described by General Mills as “a sprinkling of multicolored sugar on a white rainbow marbit.” This marshmallow replaced the original rainbow at this time.[14]
  • In 2010, the swirled marshmallows were in Lucky Charms for a limited time.
  • In June 2013, two new rainbow marshmallows were added for LGBT Pride Month.[15]
  • In 2015, new diamond shaped marshmallows were added in.
  • Introduced in 2017, limited edition cinnamon vanilla Lucky Charms include only snowman, snowball, and snowflake-shaped marshmallows.
  • In 2018 a unicorn shaped marshmallow was added and later became a permanent addition, that same year.
  • In 2018 winter-themed marshmallows, including snowmen and snowflakes, were added as part of a limited addition chocolatey winter mix.[16]FullSizeRender1920px-Lucky_Charms_(14803357412)

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Pendant

http://wpn-nyc.us/pendant.html

 

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Ferrocement Service, 2019

 

The Jailhouse Garden of Rikers Island

When the notorious New York penal colony closes, few will miss it. But an innovative sanctuary for prisoners will also be lost.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/04/nyregion/garden-rikers-island.html?te=1&nl=new-york%20today&emc=edit_ur_20191006?campaign_id=44&instance_id=12877&segment_id=17632&user_id=f44e8751a404719a8a50f5bf644eb4f5&regi_id=86075598