Category Archives: Uncategorized

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David Wojnarowicz
Untitled (Buffaloes), 1994

 

David Wojnarowicz was an artist, writer and AIDS activist who fought societal homophobia with his art. His work is pervaded by the frustration of not being able to belong to what was considered beautiful and fair. This position continually fluctuates between the desperate desire to be loved and the irresistible attraction to all that society condemns: homosexuality, sexual promiscuity, drugs, rebellion. So, let’s celebrate this month with some of his touchings words from his “Close to the Knives”,

“In loving him, I saw a cigarette between the fingers of a hand, smoke blowing backwards into the room and sputtering planes diving low through the clouds. In loving him, I saw men encouraging each other to lay down their arms. In loving him, I saw small-town laborers creating excavations that other men spend their lives trying to fill. In loving him, I saw moving films of stone buildings; I saw a hand in prison dragging snow in from the sill. In loving him, I saw great houses being erected that would soon slide into the waiting and stirring seas. I saw him freeing me from the silences of the interior life”.

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The Icebergs, 1861, Frederic Edwin Church

Santa Cruz Terrazzo Bathroom

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Santa Cruz Terrazzo Entryroom

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Entryroom (Monarchs in Eucalyptus), 2019

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Fruit Peel Workshop

“Orange Peel to Sweet Animals” time at @food__officehours 34 East Broadway, part of the final day of Food Radio Season 1: “Office Hours” Oct 26-Nov 16  @food__newyork 

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funky copy2

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Artist: Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (British, London 1812–1852 Ramsgate)

Factory: Minton(s) (British, Stoke-on-Trent, 1793–present)

Date: ca. 1850

Culture: British, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire

Medium: Stoneware

Dimensions: Overall (wt. includes wall mount): 13 1/8 in., 4.7 lb. (33.3 cm, 2.1092 kg)

Classification: Ceramics-Pottery

Credit Line: Purchase, Cynthia Hazen Polsky Gift, 1994

Accession Number: 1994.371

This shallow dish raised on a short foot is made in the encaustic process, an “inlay” technique of filling a stamped or recessed design with a contrasting colored clay or slip. The inscription on the rim in pseudo-Gothic lettering reads: “Waste Not Want Not.” Pugin made two versions of this tazza, the first with four colors and the second with six. The first version was exhibited at the 1849 Exhibition of British Manufacturers in Birmingham. Pugin believed that objects made with moral intentions would transfer these to the user, thereby promoting a more wholesome existence. The motto also reflected the agricultural and economic problems of England’s “hungry forties.”

Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812–1852) was the first architect/designer to link a specific style to morals, godliness, and social values. He believed that manufacturers should be truthful in their use of materials; that wood should look like wood instead of being painted to look like marble. This tenet of truth to materials was the crux of the Arts and Crafts movement. Pugin also believed that deceptive construction was inherent to the classical style, whereas honest construction was in accord with the Gothic. Pugin, with the architect Charles Barry, received the commission to rebuild the Houses of Parliament in the Gothic style following a fire in 1834. He designed the interior decoration in the same style, sparking the Gothic Revival in England. Pugin also designed domestic and ecclesiastical objects in ceramic, precious metals, and wood, all in the Gothic style.

Tilings by Jaap Scherphuis

https://www.jaapsch.net/tilings/#pentagon

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The 15 types of pentagonal tilings discovered so far, the 15th (convex monohedral) pentagonal tiling, discovered in 2015

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Terminology

Tiling or tessellation
A dissection of the infinite flat plane into shapes of a finite area.
Tile
One of the shapes that forms a tiling.
Isometry
A distance-preserving mapping of the plane. There are four types: translations, rotations, reflections, and glide reflections.
Symmetry of a tiling
An isometry that maps the tile boundaries onto tile boundaries. In other words this is some transformation that leaves the tiling looking the same as before.
Periodic tiling
A tiling that has two independent translation symmetries, i.e. a tiling that repeats itself along two different axes like a wallpaper pattern.
Primitive unit or Unit Parallelogram
A section of the tiling (usually a parallelogram or a set of neighbouring tiles) that generates the whole tiling using only translations, and which is as small as possible.
Fundamental unit
A section of the tiling (usually a set of neighbouring tiles) that generates the whole tiling using the tiling symmetries (not just the translations), and which is as small as possible.
Monohedral tiling
A tiling where all the tiles are congruent to each other, i.e. all have the same size and shape (though they are allowed to be mirror images).
Isohedral tiling
A monohedral tiling where for any two tiles there is a symmetry of the tiling that maps one tile to the other.
k-Isohedral tiling (k is a positive integer)
A monohedral tiling where the tiles form k classes such that for any two in the same class there is a symmetry of the tiling that maps one tile to the other, and for any pair of tiles in different classes no such symmetry exists. Note that 1-isohedral is the same as isohedral. In the applet, each class of tile has its own colour.
Edge-to-edge tiling
A tiling of polygons such that no corner of one tile touches the side of another.

 

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