In History

 

 

13_Kincaid In History

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Pieter Bruegel, The Harvesters, 1565 (oil on wood)

 

 

Richard Foerster

Though they stoop and sweat
outside a stingy circle
that the pear tree affords …though the mustardy sheaves
of their morning’s labor
lie stiff in their ranks as battle-tallied dead . . . and though
the tree itself, coiling
ungracefully heavenward, pasta blue steeple, splits
their world with its axis,
here is Eden after allwhich the artist makes
us contemplate
by planting in the foregroundthat husky, unkempt reaper
with his legs splayed wide,
forcing our gaze crotchward,to the solid drowse
of his codpiece so casually
unlaced, while another,nearby, holding summer-
ripe fruit firmly to his lips,
stares out at us, and eats.

~~~~~~

 

William Carlos Williams

Summer !
the painting is organized
about a young

reaper enjoying his
noonday rest
completely

relaxed
from his morning labors
sprawled

in fact sleeping
unbuttoned
on his back

the women
have brought him his lunch
perhaps

a spot of wine
they gather gossiping
under a tree

whose shade
carelessly
he does not share the

resting
center of
their workaday world

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Pieter Brueghel, Hunters in the Snow (1565)

Oil on canvas, 46 inches x 63.75 inches. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

 

Brueghel’s WinterWalter de la Mare

Jagg’d mountain peaks and skies ice-green
Wall in the wild, cold scene below.
Churches, farms, bare copse, the sea
In freezing quiet of winter show;
Where ink-black shapes on fields in flood
Curling, skating, and sliding go.
To left, a gabled tavern; a blaze;
Peasants; a watching child; and lo,
Muffled, mute–beneath naked trees
In sharp perspective set a-row–
Trudge huntsmen, sinister spears aslant,
Dogs snuffling behind them in the snow;
And arrowlike, lean, athwart the air
Swoops into space a crow.

But flame, nor ice, nor piercing rock,
Nor silence, as of a frozen sea,
Nor that slant inward infinite line
Of signboard, bird, and hill, and tree,
Give more than subtle hint of him
Who squandered here life’s mystery.

~~~~~~~~~~

The Hunter in the Snow

William Carlos Williams

The over-all picture is winter
icy mountains
in the background the return

from the hunt it is toward evening
from the left
sturdy hunters lead in

their pack the inn-sign
hanging from a
broken hinge is a stag a crucifix

between his antlers the cold
inn yard is
deserted but for a huge bonfire

that flares wind-driven tended by
women who cluster
about it to the right beyond

the hill is a pattern of skaters
Brueghel the painter
concerned with it all has chosen

a winter-struck bush for his
foreground to
complete the picture

icarus

Pieter Brueghel, The Fall of Icarus

Oil-tempera, 29 inches x 44 inches. Museum of Fine Arts, Brussels.

 

Landscape with the Fall of Icarus

William Carlos Williams

According to Brueghel
when Icarus fell
it was spring

a farmer was ploughing
his field
the whole pageantry

of the year was
awake tingling
with itself

sweating in the sun
that melted
the wings’ wax

unsignificantly
off the coast
there was

a splash quite unnoticed
this was
Icarus drowning

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Musee des Beaux Arts

 

W. H. Auden

About suffering they were never wrong,
The old Masters: how well they understood
Its human position: how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer’s horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.

In Breughel’s Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water, and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.

Jimmy’s Ridgewood

Ficus Interfaith Research & Properties

Jimmy’s Ridgewood

55-19 Metropolitan Ave, Ridgewood, NY 11385

May 6, 2017- June 2, 2017
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

The cultivation and breeding of animals, plants and fungi for food, fiber, fuel, medicine and other products can be used to sustain and enhance human life.  Agriculture was a key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that nurtured the development of society.

Modern agronomy, plant breeding and agrochemicals such as pesticides and fertilizers have sharply increased yields from cultivation, but have also caused widespread ecological damage with negative human health effects. Selective breeding and modern practices in animal husbandry have similarly increased the output of meat, but have raised concerns about animal welfare and the health effects of the antibiotics, growth hormones, and other chemicals commonly used in industrial meat production. Genetically modified organisms are an increasing component of agriculture, debilitating the potential of pandemic starvation, although they are banned in several countries and their long term impact is unknown. Agricultural food production and water management are global issues that require teamwork and innovative thinking. Significant degradation of land and water resources, including the depletion of aquifers, has been observed in recent decades. The effects of climate change on agriculture and of agriculture on climate change are connected yet still not fully understood.
The major agricultural products can be broadly grouped into foods, fibers, fuels, and structural materials. Specific foods include cereals (grains), vegetables, fruits, oils, meats and spices. Fibers include cotton, wool, hemp, silk and flax. Structural materials include lumber and bamboo. Other useful materials are also produced by plants, such as resins, dyes, drugs, perfumes, biofuels and ornamental products such as cut flowers.

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Richard Rohr Meditation

At our low points, we are one step away from either enlightenment or despair. Without faith that there is a Bigger Pattern, and the grace to surrender to that Bigger Pattern, most people/ we can and/or will move into despair, negativity, or cynicism. We need a promise, a hopeful direction, or it is very hard not to give u! When you have not yet learned what transformation feels or looks like, someone—perhaps some loving human or simply God’s own embrace—needs to hold you now because you cannot hold yourself. And that is good and real as much as all.

“But to tear down a factory or to revolt against a government or to avoid repair of a motorcycle because it is a system is to attack effects rather than causes; and as long as the attack is upon effects only, no change is possible. The true system, the real system, is our present construction of systematic thought itself, rationality itself, and if a factory is torn down but the rationality which produced it is left standing, then that rationality will simply produce another factory. If a revolution destroys a systematic government, but the systematic patterns of thought that produced that government are left intact, then those patterns will repeat themselves in the succeeding government. There’s so much talk about the system. And so little understanding.”

Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Ghosts of Evolution

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-kYjjphxJY
WALK-in’ DOWN a CI-TY STREET, orange BALLS at my FEET
. . . Small CAR-ri-on-FEED-ing DIN-O-SAURS: they’re TAK-ing a TREAT
They’ve been EAT-ing . . . GINK-GO FRUIT . . . since the MID-dle Jur-AS-SIC
. . . EAT ’em up DI-nos, ELSE THEY’RE SQUASHED by ALL of this TRAF-FIC

GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing GHOSTS of E-vo-LU-TION
DEEP . . . TIME . . . EYES . . . give me FOS-sil RE-so-LU-TION
GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing MON-sters EV’ry-WHERE
a-NA-chron-IS-tic FRUITS AND THORNS are GIV-ing ME a SCARE

LEARN to SEE a GI-ant SLOTH or BIG-TUSKED MAS-to-DON
. . . Take a TRIP to a LO-cal GRO-CRY STORE with DAD-dy OR with MOM
. . . Look for BINS of BIG FRUIT . . . WITH their . . . HU-mun-gous SEED
Just WHO COULD SWAL-low and POOP THOSE PITS,
Who COULD those BIG FRUITS FEED?

PON-der A-vo-CA-DO . . be-FORE it’s GUA-ca-MO-LE
To PLANT THOSE PITS in a MOUND OF POOP takes a BIG BUTT, HO-ly MO-ly!
Who’s LIV-ing THERE to-DAY . . . in the HILLS of pe-RU?
Whose AN-AL SPHINC-ter-could HAN-DLE-the-JOB-that GROUND SLOTHS USED to DO?
Or-may-be-it-was TOX-o-DON who CO-E-VOLVED that DARK GREEN en-IG-MA?
Chuck-ie D found TO-xy’s SKULL AND BONES on the PLAINS of AR-gen-TI-NA

GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing GHOSTS of E-vo-LU-TION
DEEP . . . TIME . . . EYES . . . give me FOS-sil RE-so-LU-TION
GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing MON-sters EV’ry-WHERE
a-NA-chron-IS-tic FRUITS AND THORNS are GIV-ing ME a SCARE

What a-BOUT THOSE JUI-cy MAN-GO FRUITS e-VOLVED in TROP-i-cal A-SIA?
Who could SWAL-low-and-POOP-those-PITS-WITH-OUT-get-ting-MASS-IVE HIP dis-PLAY-SIA
****Well . . . CER-tain-ly . . . EL . . .E-PHANTS and RHI-NO-cer-OUS
But THEY’RE NOT GHOSTS at LEAST NOT YET ex-TINCT be-CAUSE of US.

GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing GHOSTS of E-vo-LU-TION
DEEP . . . TIME . . . EYES . . . give me FOS-sil RE-so-LU-TION
GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing MON-sters EV’ry-WHERE
a-NA-chron-IS-tic FRUITS AND THORNS are GIV-ing ME a SCARE

No SU-PER-MAR-ket-SELLS-a-MER-i-ca’s GE-NUS mac-LUR-A
But HORS-es ATE those GREEN SOFT-BALLS, of THAT I CAN as-SURE YA
a-na-chron-IS-TIC THOSE . . . FRUITS BE-CAME when HOR-ses WENT ex-TINCT
. . . HERE-in-the a-MER-I-CAS, post-PLEIST-O-CENE I THINK
But the SPAN-IARDS BROUGHT the HOR-SES BACK and LOOSED THEM ON the LAND
Ma-CLUR-A TREES have a PART-NER NOW, they can MAKE a-NO-ther STAND

I’m seeing . . .

GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing GHOSTS of E-vo-LU-TION
DEEP . . . TIME . . . EYES . . . give me FOS-sil RE-so-LU-TION
GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing MON-sters EV’ry-WHERE
a-NA-chron-IS-tic FRUITS AND THORNS are GIV-ing ME a SCARE

The SAD-DEST PLANT has GOT TO BE our LOVE-ly HO-ney LO-CUST
Its MAS-SIVE SEED pods HAVE NO FRIENDS I can SEE in FOS-sil-FO-CUS
And WHAT a-BOUT its TRUNK OF THORNS? Now TELL me WHAT that’s FOR?
. . . DREAM-ing TUSKS of MAS-TO-DONS strip-ping BARK to EAT once MORE
In a COLD . . . BLEAK . . . WIN-TER . . . when NO-thing ELSE is GREEN
Oh NO, those TIMES have-LONG SINCE PASSED; this IS the HO-lo-CENE

You can STILL find this AWE . . . SOME TREE be-DECKED in PODS and THORNS
. . . IN THE WILDS of the PRAIR-IE STATES . . . LOOK-ing SO for-LORN
So SHUT YOUR EYES in HOR-ROR . . . when IN a PARK-ing LOT
These HARD-y TREES were BRED BY US to HAVE NO PODS to ROT
Noth-ing MES-sy AT ALL . . . to SWEEP UP or CLOT . . .
No THORNS to POKE a PASS-ER-BY or SKEW-er a TOT.

GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing GHOSTS of E-vo-LU-TION
DEEP . . . TIME . . . EYES . . . give me FOS-sil RE-so-LU-TION
GHOSTS . . . GHOSTS . . . I’m SEE-ing MON-sters EV’ry-WHERE
a-NA-chron-IS-tic FRUITS AND THORNS are GIV-ing ME a SCARE

crizzle

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/27/robert-macfarlane-word-hoard-rewilding-landscape