Tag Archives: Ficus Interfaith

Introducing

“Introducing”, an exhibition of work by Kayla Ephros, Katja Farin, Vanessa Gully-Santiago, Ficus Interfaith, Maren Karlson, Amelia Lockwood, Gozié Ojini, Lauren Quin, Pauline Shaw, Alix Vernet, and Amia Yokoyama at in lieu in Los Angeles, CA

Two Roosters, 2020
18 x 20 x 1.5 inches

Noplace

PPOW_Summer Group Show 2020_20200708-CO0A9847_websizeIMG_2482

 

 

Noplace – PR

 

That Hideous Strength, 2020

cementitous terrazzo, zinc, brass, walnut, various veneers

30 ¾ x 48 inches (width, opened)

SculptureCenter///In Practice: Total Disbelief

In Practice: Total Disbelief considers artistic engagements with dimensions of doubt as they contribute to the formation of social life. Across media, the works in the exhibition engage formal tools that uphold belief and produce what we consider to be true – narrative and cinematic tropes, photographic technologies, empiricism, and others – and use them to make any number of other truth claims. A position of disbelief may see these aesthetic conventions as valid, but still delimited by external forces, as if they are suggesting something, but not the right thing, or not saying all they can or could say.

While characterized on one hand by the clean slate of a baseline lack of faith, an active engagement with disbelief also means taking stock of astonishment, navigating defense mechanisms, and pitting skepticism against a real desire to be convinced and to know. In Practice: Total Disbelief posits that artworks are the products and by-products of these dynamics, appearing as objects, images, and activities that sustain uncertainty, not in the least about the capacities of the art object itself.

The exhibition features newly commissioned works by: Qais AssaliAndrew CannonJesse ChunHadi FallahpishehFicus InterfaithEmilie Louise GossiauxLaurie KangDevin Kenny and Andrea SolstadK.R.M. Mooneysidony o’nealMariana SilvaJordan Strafer, and Andrew Norman Wilson and is curated by Kyle Dancewicz, SculptureCenter’s Director of Exhibitions and Programs.

SC_IP_0468SC_IP_0470SC_IP_0597

 

Ficus Interfaith, The 59th Street Bridge Song, 2020,. Cementitious terrazzo, brass, zinc, walnut. 42 x 66.75 x 1.25 inches (106.7 x 169.5 x 1.25 cm). Courtesy the artists. Photo: Kyle Knodell

Banquet

Banquet: Marcello Dolce, Sessa Englund, Sophie Friedman-Pappas, Audrey Gair, Chris Hanke, Ficus Interfaith, Rindon Johnson, Isabelle Frances McGuire, Sam Shoemaker, Julia Thompson

December 14, 2019 – January 18, 2020

—————————————————————–

“I propose a feast for the eyes, sumptuous, multiplictious, and occasionally disgusting. This is a banquet of works of art that include milk, rice, bread, vegetables, piles of fat, carpets of pollen, sheets of wax or chocolate, shit, urine, blood, and assorted rots. Not all dishes lend themselves to this table; only those servings that are both excessive and incessantly replenished, for this profusion of substance asserts the commodiousness of contemporary appetites, both for pleasure and transgression.”
– Buzz Spector, “A Profusion of Substance,” Artforum (October, 1989).

Banquet brings together ten artists whose work references, investigates, or employs organic substances – such as food, bodily fluids, living/non-living organisms, and raw earth – as material. The digestive cycle is on full display. Works by Chris Hanke and Julia Thompson incorporate powdered sweeteners and juices while Sophie Friedman-Pappas’ and Audrey Gair’s Untitled (Toilet Seat) and Marcello Dolce’s stole(n)cover give us a view of the other end of things. Elsewhere, a raw earthiness is evident. Sessa Englund’s works evoke abstracted organic forms and Rindon Johnson’s rawhide strips are dipped in water and dirt sourced just outside the gallery. Within Sam Shoemaker’s Untitled work lies something very much alive – a fungi of the Gonaderma Lucidum variety. A living, breathing organism that will grow over the course of the exhibition. Ficus Interfaith grinds down waste and loose rock material to develop their terrazzo pieces and, in doing so, calls into question what is natural and what is not. Isabelle Frances McGuire’s circular Ring can be seen as a metaphor for the exhibition as a whole. The enclosed loop of dead flies speaks to our multiple cycles of life and the richness of pleasure and disgust we encounter throughout them.

 

7_2000_c26_2000_c25_2000_c

 

Ficus Interfaith. The Woodcutter, 2019. Cementitious terrazzo, various rocks, walnut, domestic veneers. 24 x 20 x 2.75 inches closed, 24 x 40 x 1.375 inches open.

Pendant

http://wpn-nyc.us/pendant.html

 

pendantA.jpg

 

 

 

 

Pendant_31

Ferrocement Service, 2019

 

Ficus Interfaith

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2019-06-19 at 3.12.54 PMIMGL9287IMGL9303IMGL9288IMGL9218IMGL9219IMGL9221IMGL9311IMGL9232IMGL9225IMGL9259IMGL9263IMGL9268IMGL9275IMGL9280IMGL9324IMGL9322IMGL9318IMGL9329IMGL9244

Ficus Interfaith is a collaboration between Ryan Bush (b. 1990, Denver, CO) and Raphael Martinez Cohen (b. 1989, New York, NY). The artists, who live in New York City, met at the Rhode Island School of Design and have been working together since 2013. Ficus Interfaith were recent artists in residence at 2727 California Street (Berkeley, CA) and Shandaken: Storm King (New Windsor, NY). Their work has been exhibited at Kai Matsumiya (New York, NY), From the Desk of Lucy Bull, (Los Angeles, CA), Interstate Projects (Brooklyn, NY), Prairie (Chicago, IL) and they were participating artists for Clay Club 2018 at SculptureCenter (Queens, New York) and NOSCHOOL in Far Rockaway, NY and Berkeley, CA.

 

Rubus Armeniacus (Himalayan blackberry)

“Rubus Armeniacus is an exemplary political decoration, a nutritious ornament that clandestinely modifies infrastructural morphology. Here, affect invades the center. Rubus inverts and puns upon the proprietous subordination of affective expenditure to intelligence. Tracing a mortal palimpsest of potential surfaces in acutely compromised situations, Rubus shows us how to invent. This is the serious calling of style.”

– Office for Soft Architecture, Rubus Armeniacus: A Common Architectural Motif in the Temperate Mesophytic Region (Cabinet Magazine, Issue 6 Horticulture, Spring 2002)

 

Decoration is a poetic and political force. Though the Arts and Crafts movement advocated for decoration’s importance, the decorative arts succumbed to society’s shift towards machine production and division of labor. The result was the chastening of decorative arts into “design” – a cultural form that became inextricably linked with the growth of capitalism. Modernism’s disavowal of ornamentation engendered a negative relationship between Western architecture and anything that could be thought of as “decorative”. Recently, decoration has been somewhat rehabilitated as a concept in art and architecture, but it remains politically fraught.

To decorate one’s home is an artistic practice, but it is always situated in the economy and the pursuit of exchange value. Interior decorating displays one’s taste and style through the collection and curation of objects and furnishings. The formal focus of Modernist discourse often obscured hidden layers of social and economic determinants, but decoration always has some political content. Through consumer culture, home decoration posits the inhabitant within the field of social capital as a means to justify materialism. It is not a mere visual spectacle. It is also a mechanism that reinforces and disseminates the encoding of socio-political structures, and thus reifies capitalist ideologies. Decoration facilitates and reproduces privileges and class status and with that, exclusion.

Today, the domestic environment can be considered one of the primary sites where radical change is taking place in everyday life. We exist in a moment in which we are able to reassess the line between leisure and labor. Like many activities today, decorating is both pastime and work. It’s a hobby that makes home life more pleasurable, while at the same time adding to the value of one’s financial and social capital, bolstering the overall value of the home.

Rubus Armeniacus (Himalayan blackberry) presents works by nine artists and architects. The works offer ways to understand the rapid social, economic, and environmental shifts our increasingly neoliberal society is undergoing today, and attempts to unpack the implications of decoration as a carrier of both personal and political meaning.

_________

Featuring works by Denise Scott Brown (b. 1931, Nkana, Zambia), Milano Chow (b. 1987, Los Angeles, CA), Samuel Farrier (b. 1989, Woodland, CA), Ficus Interfaith (Ryan Bush, b. 1990, Denver, CO and Raphael Martinez-Cohen, b. 1989, New York, NY), Nora Maité Nieves (b. 1980, San Juan, PR), Kayode Ojo (b. 1990, Cookeville, TN), Sean Raspet (b. 1981, Washington, DC), Libby Rothfeld (b. 1990, New Brunswick, NJ), and Allan Wexler (b. 1949, Bridgeport, CT)

Curated by Jessica Kwok

 

Jessica’s Apartment is open by appointment only To schedule an appointment: email jessica.s.kwok@gmail.com or call +1 (347) 443-3549 For press inquiries: email jessica.s.kwok@gmail.com

Screen Shot 2019-05-28 at 12.16.06 PM

Water Chesnut Frieze, 2019

Screen Shot 2019-05-28 at 12.16.16 PMScreen Shot 2019-05-28 at 12.16.24 PM

funky copy2

Frame House Whereabouts

Ficus Interfaith
Frame House Whereabouts

September 14 – October 21, 2018

Interstate Projects
Opening Reception September 14, 6-9pm

 

 

The word ‘building’ is both a noun and a verb: the structure itself and the act of making it. As a noun, a building is shelter that has a roof, walls and stands more or less permanently in one place.

Ancient households layered sand to cover compacted earth; creating a warm, soft covering that could be replaced regularly. In some dwellings, seed shells such as peanut and sunflower were scattered across the floor. As it was walked on, the oil from the shells would coat the occupants’ feet and become spread out across the ground, hardening its surface while making it more compact, stable, and free of dust.

Archaeologists use the term, terrazzo, to describe some of the floors created over 10,000 years ago in Neolithic settlements across Western Asia. Excavation notes illustrate beautiful, dusty pads of mottled stone chips pressed and polished into patterns in the ground. This practice continued through antiquity as marble artisans fashioned the floors of their own homes with the leftover marble tile scraps from the days’ work. Today, many of the aggregates used in terrazzo are pulled from the industrial waste-stream, continuing its history of reuse in construction.

For this exhibition, Ficus Interfaith presents a series of terrazzo frames. These frames, along with an additional suite of sculptures, describe navigating a house. The works occupy two floors, vibrating between the distinctions of display room and domestic space. Windows and doors operate as metaphors for other worlds, portals with the potential to activate your imagination. Embracing the spirit of collaboration and highlighting the pragmatism of reuse, the sculptures invite all to ‘play house’. The gallery acts as a skeleton with borrowed flesh, the unlived foundation of a more complete and separately constructed space.


Ficus Interfaith
 (is a collaboration between Ryan Bush (b. 1990, Denver CO) and Raphael Cohen (b. 1989, New York, NY). As much a research initiative as a sculptural practice, Ficus Interfaith pursues projects that focus on their personal and collective interactions with nature and natural history. Their work has been exhibited at Prairie (Chicago, IL), Alyssa Davis (NYC), MX Gallery (NYC) and Gern en Regalia (NYC) and they were artists in residence this year at 2727 California Street (Berkeley, CA) and Shandaken: Storm King (NY).

FicusInterfaith_Interstate1FicusInterfaith_Interstate2FicusInterfaith_Interstate3FicusInterfaith_Interstate4FicusInterfaith_Interstate5FicusInterfaith_Interstate6FicusInterfaith_Interstate7FicusInterfaith_Interstate8FicusInterfaith_Interstate9FicusInterfaith_Interstate10FicusInterfaith_Interstate11FicusInterfaith_Interstate12FicusInterfaith_Interstate13FicusInterfaith_Interstate14FicusInterfaith_Interstate15FicusInterfaith_Interstate16FicusInterfaith_Interstate17FicusInterfaith_Interstate18FicusInterfaith_Interstate19FicusInterfaith_Interstate20FicusInterfaith_Interstate21FicusInterfaith_Interstate22FicusInterfaith_Interstate23FicusInterfaith_Interstate24FicusInterfaith_Interstate25

 

http://www.interstateprojects.org/index.php?/ficus-interfaith/

Clay Club

Projects by artists Alisa Baremboymektor garciaFicus InterfaithSteffani JemisonSara Magenheimer, and Jesse Wine & Cassie Griffin.

Clay Club 2018 Playlists by AHMDLizzi Bougatsos, and Diamond Stingily.

SculptureCenter was founded as Clay Club in 1928 by sculptor Dorothea Denslow. While Clay Club’s art courses and exhibitions generally took place in Denslow’s Brooklyn studio, or, slightly later, in a carriage house on West 8th Street, the organization’s artists and students gathered on Staten Island every summer from 1928 to 1939 to picnic and collectively build temporary monumental sculptures out of natural clay.

On Saturday, August 18, SculptureCenter will revive its founding summer tradition by inviting six artists to reconsider the idea of group sculpture that motivated the original Clay Club parties. SculptureCenter’s Long Island City exhibition space will open to the public with more than two thousand pounds of clay available for participation in artist-led projects or for free use.

Join us on Saturday, August 18 from 10am to 2pm, for music, food and drinks by local vendors including Hibino LIC, Levante, and The Mill, and drop-in art projects. This program is free, open to the public, and for all ages. No RSVP is required.

Dance of the Mudmixers
Compilation of 16mm archival footage of Clay Club’s summer picnic on Staten Island

This is SculptureCenter’s second annual Clay Club program. Last year’s Clay Club artists were Christian Holstad, Joanna Malinowska, Kate Newby, Hayley Silverman and Ser Serpas, Agathe Snow, and Patrice Renee Washington, with music by SHYBOI (KUNQ/DISCWOMAN).

 

 

IMG_5696IMG_5706IMG_5712IMG_5721IMG_5717IMG_5716IMG_5715IMG_8876IMG_8859IMG_5711IMG_5698unnamed.png