Tag Archives: sculpture center

SculptureCenter///In Practice: Total Disbelief

In Practice: Total Disbelief considers artistic engagements with dimensions of doubt as they contribute to the formation of social life. Across media, the works in the exhibition engage formal tools that uphold belief and produce what we consider to be true – narrative and cinematic tropes, photographic technologies, empiricism, and others – and use them to make any number of other truth claims. A position of disbelief may see these aesthetic conventions as valid, but still delimited by external forces, as if they are suggesting something, but not the right thing, or not saying all they can or could say.

While characterized on one hand by the clean slate of a baseline lack of faith, an active engagement with disbelief also means taking stock of astonishment, navigating defense mechanisms, and pitting skepticism against a real desire to be convinced and to know. In Practice: Total Disbelief posits that artworks are the products and by-products of these dynamics, appearing as objects, images, and activities that sustain uncertainty, not in the least about the capacities of the art object itself.

The exhibition features newly commissioned works by: Qais AssaliAndrew CannonJesse ChunHadi FallahpishehFicus InterfaithEmilie Louise GossiauxLaurie KangDevin Kenny and Andrea SolstadK.R.M. Mooneysidony o’nealMariana SilvaJordan Strafer, and Andrew Norman Wilson and is curated by Kyle Dancewicz, SculptureCenter’s Director of Exhibitions and Programs.

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Ficus Interfaith, The 59th Street Bridge Song, 2020,. Cementitious terrazzo, brass, zinc, walnut. 42 x 66.75 x 1.25 inches (106.7 x 169.5 x 1.25 cm). Courtesy the artists. Photo: Kyle Knodell

Clay Club

Projects by artists Alisa Baremboymektor garciaFicus InterfaithSteffani JemisonSara Magenheimer, and Jesse Wine & Cassie Griffin.

Clay Club 2018 Playlists by AHMDLizzi Bougatsos, and Diamond Stingily.

SculptureCenter was founded as Clay Club in 1928 by sculptor Dorothea Denslow. While Clay Club’s art courses and exhibitions generally took place in Denslow’s Brooklyn studio, or, slightly later, in a carriage house on West 8th Street, the organization’s artists and students gathered on Staten Island every summer from 1928 to 1939 to picnic and collectively build temporary monumental sculptures out of natural clay.

On Saturday, August 18, SculptureCenter will revive its founding summer tradition by inviting six artists to reconsider the idea of group sculpture that motivated the original Clay Club parties. SculptureCenter’s Long Island City exhibition space will open to the public with more than two thousand pounds of clay available for participation in artist-led projects or for free use.

Join us on Saturday, August 18 from 10am to 2pm, for music, food and drinks by local vendors including Hibino LIC, Levante, and The Mill, and drop-in art projects. This program is free, open to the public, and for all ages. No RSVP is required.

Dance of the Mudmixers
Compilation of 16mm archival footage of Clay Club’s summer picnic on Staten Island

This is SculptureCenter’s second annual Clay Club program. Last year’s Clay Club artists were Christian Holstad, Joanna Malinowska, Kate Newby, Hayley Silverman and Ser Serpas, Agathe Snow, and Patrice Renee Washington, with music by SHYBOI (KUNQ/DISCWOMAN).

 

 

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Clay Club at Sculpture Center

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